The Exmoor Ponies of Hindhead Common

Gibbet Hill stands smack in the middle between Portsmouth and London. It’s the second-highest hill in the county of Surrey, and the last thing you need if you’re building a road between these two important cities. But a road was needed, and the first one went right over the top. Not great for horse-drawn carriages, and a bit of a notorious ambush point for highwayman and brigands. So in 1826 a new road was built, and this one swept around the hill and along the rim of The Devil’s Punchbowl, a large natural amphitheatre and beauty spot.

I first heard the name Devil’s Punchbowl years ago, through listening to traffic reports on the radio. As the only single-lane section of the A3, it was an infamous blackspot and the blight of commuters. Something had to be done, and in 2011 the Hindhead Tunnel was opened. This 1.14 mile engineering masterpiece bored straight through the hill. Great news for commuters. But even better news for conservationists, as it allowed the old road above to be reclaimed by nature.

The old A3 ran right through Devil’s Punchbowl and Hindhead Common, splitting them apart. Now however, no such barrier exists. Grazing of the heathland by commoners ceased around the mid-1900s, and this allowed the spread of birch and bracken over the heather. But this invasion is now being reversed by a programme of active reclamation. Exmoor ponies graze the common, helping to restore and maintain these areas, and if you’re lucky you might just spot them. I’ve been lucky. And although they’re wild, they’re also friendly and rather curious. Of course, it helps if you have a couple of carrots to hand.

Exmoor Ponies Hindhead Common / Yashica Mat 124G / Kodak Tri-X / Semi-stand developed in Rodinal 1+99 for 60 mins

Exmoor Ponies Hindhead Common

Exmoor Ponies Hindhead Common

Exmoor Ponies Hindhead Common

Exmoor Ponies Hindhead Common

Exmoor Ponies Hindhead Common

Note: Output on Short Stories is hardly prolific at the best of times. This website is where I keep the photos of things that I’m up to and things I like to document. But sometimes I’m just not up to much. Or if I am, they might not be the sort of things I should be photographing and sharing. But it’s going to be even quieter round here for the next month or so. As my latest work project reaches its peak, I’ll be embarking on a longer than usual period of travelling. But I will be taking a camera. And I may even get the chance to use it.

Click here for my tutorial on stand development with Rodinal

10 comments on “The Exmoor Ponies of Hindhead Common

        1. That’s odd then, I rarely use sharpening in photoshop, but my scanner has built in sharpening settings from None to High, and I leave it at the default setting of medium. This always seems absolutely fine.

          On the few occasions I have had consumer scans done in the typical high street shops, they are always horrendously over sharpened. Perhaps when you get professional scans, they don’t do any sharpening in the scanner because they expect the professional customer wants to have ultimate control?

  1. I think that’s probably the expectation. I like that, actually. I used to use a local lab that always overbrightened everything and was difficult to fix later. I probably just need to work on my computer skills.

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