Race With The Devil

The South Downs Way is a 100 mile national trail that follows the old routes along the chalk ridges of the South Downs, many of which have been used for 8000 years. Jane’s lucky enough to live in this part of the country, and last Friday we took a nine mile walk that included several sections of the trail. It turned out to be a race against the weather. A race in which we lost. Massively.

All photos Fujifilm X100F


Through the wayward pines, and some early indications of the weather to come


Lambs! Hundreds of ’em…


Some serious rain starting to close in….


The Devil’s Jumps are a group of five large burial mounds on the South Downs Way, just outside the hamlet of Treyford. They’re around three to four thousand years old, and the main line of five barrows is aligned with sunset on Midsummer Day. We had our sandwiches on the top of one, and now I’m wondering if we’ve been a bit disrespectful. I mean, I’ve seen Poltergeist and Pet Semetary. Don’t mess with ancient burial sites.

The Devil's Jumps Fingerpost

The Devil's Jumps

These guys know something is going down


All along the watchtower


Just a few miles to go, but things ahead are not looking too good…


…but we’re also being chased from behind

That was the last snap before we were hit by just the type of end-of-times rainstorm you’d expect in 2020. Obviously I dealt with it in my usual stoical way1, but it’s always good to know: in the rain, no one can see your tears.

1. The original title of this post, ‘How I Survived a Hurricane’, was rejected by the fact-checkers.

Storm

In the alternative universe where a certain microbe didn’t leap from a bat, there’s a version of me holidaying in Barcelona right now. (NOTE: I am neither a virologist nor a quantum physicist). And even though my version of me is serval hundred quid lighter and stuck in England, it’s great to be able to do some of the simple things that make life feel normal. For the last couple of weekends, this has meant walking through the South Downs with the dogs, and spending time in the pub with friends. Just like people used to do back in Normal Times.

But it’s hard to know which way things are going, on all levels. Photos are a lot easier than words for me right now. There’s a sense of Autumn in the air, and it feels like there might be a storm coming.

Midhurst & the South Downs / All photos Fujifilm X100F


There’s a polo game going on over there in the fields. No spectators allowed these days due to Covid.


It’s not easy being this handsome


The dogs and the chickens co-exist relatively peacefully


Potato Wars!


And in the pub with friends. As it should be.


On the tipsy shuffle back home at sundown and past the ruins of Cowdray House, destroyed by fire in September 1793

In An Instant: Ella & Rosie On Polaroid 600

Previoulsy on Short Stories (I’ve always wanted to say that), I mentioned using Polaroid 600 colour film in the SX-70, with an ND filter to correct the exposure. After shooting the whole pack I feel it fairs poorly against the SX-70 film. All eight shots have a distinct magenta cast and a washed-out look. I’ll be sticking to the SX-70 film in future.

But I couldn’t pass up the chance to try the 600 black and white film, and in a rare moment of photographic cooperation Jane’s daughters helped me out. You can get in really close with the SX-70 Sonar, but you’ve got to nail the focus when the depth of field is that narrow. I always try to make the scans of my Polaroids match the prints as closely as possible, but in the case of these two shots I think the originals have a slighter warmer tone. It’s a nice feel, and I’m looking forward to shooting the remaining six shots in the pack.

Ella & Rosie / Polaroid SX-70 Sonar / Polaroid 600 Black and White Film with Polaroid ND filter

Polaroid 600 Black and White Film

Polaroid 600 Black and White Film