Team Building At Thorpe Park

There are certain phrases that have the ability to provoke a feeling of deep apprehension within me.

“We need to talk”, is one that stands out, for the very good reason that…..well…..I’m a man. Obviously.

“I think now is the appropriate time to tell you I haven’t always been a woman”, once gave me pause for thought.

But worst of all, the one that really fills me with a sense of impending dread and brings me out in a cold sweat:

“We’re going on a team building day”.

I remember the 1990s. Running round the woods. Firing paintballs at a load of ultra-competitive, overweight and unfit middle aged men you really didn’t like. Wishing they were real bullets.

But things have moved on; now I’m the unfit middle-aged man. Bugger.

All photos shot with Fujifilm X100T

Team building thorpe park fujifilm x100t


Airlink DCS Kick-Off Meeting

Two days in Nice on the French Rivera for the Airlink DCS Kick-Off meeting. Staying at the Villa Azur in Villeneuve Loubet, which is practically in the sea….

Nice, October 5/6 2017
Camera: Fujifilm X100T


A quick stroll round the Marina nearby.

Off to Antibes for a night out with Carole.

Arriving at the Belair offices

Great views of the Alps and the sea from the office.

Me (2nd from right), a couple of colleagues, and the Airlink Team


Southwest Celebration Party

Those of us who work in the London office and who spent May in the US supporting the Southwest project were rewarded with a party. We gathered on the side of the river and were whisked away on a cruise along the Thames. Sadly I very quickly lost the light and was only able to fire off half a roll before having to go digital with the X100T. Which is probably a good thing, as thanks to the free bar things got seriously out of focus soon after.

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Camera: Fujifilm X100T

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Southwest Cutover

Baltimore & Washington
Camera: Fujifilm X100T

First morning in Baltimore and I take a stroll round by the hotel. It’s the usual desolate airport environment, hotels, car parks and not much else. And then, completely incongruously, I come across the Bates Motel.

The extraordinarily utilitarian Springhill Suites


And the awe inspiring view from my home for the month of May

Fortunately there’s a glut of high quality eating establishments in the locale

A quick spur of the moment Uber in to Washington on a cloudy day

Lets go over to our White House correspondent

Protester in front of the White House.

Protest against the Iranian Regime

First days at Baltimore airport

That’s a worrying amount of flights…

Is this the start of the end?

Chillin’ at Chilis

Almost as many dogs as humans fly southwest

Arriving into Washington, this time on the MARC train and on a much nicer day

Union Station DC

Actually his approval rating is nearer 36% now. Just saying

No Trumpsters here, then

This is what the end of a long day with me looks like

The fantastically mediocre Olive Grove

Our last night together, dinner at the wonderful Sushi Q

Back to London, via a long stopover in Detroit

Ah, home


Arrival

Atlanta, Georgia. Not my final destination, but US regulations dictate that I clear customs and immigration at the first point of entry. I’m nervous. I’m midway along a twisting line that’s snaking its way towards the cubicle one hundred feet ahead. Inside, a granite-faced immigration officer. My hands are clenched into solid fists and I feel the beads of sweat popping out on my forehead. In front of me, a young Hispanic woman with nervous eyes clutches a mewling baby. Behind me, an elderly couple argue in Polish, the man hissing at his wife through clenched teeth. You could slice the atmosphere with a taser.

I’m told that US immigration can be tough. Grueling. That they ask you questions. Ideological questions. One wrong answer and you’re on the next flight home. Or worse. I use my balled hands to knuckle the perspiration from my eyes. My Adam’s apple is bobbing up and down like a monkey on a stick.

I’m near the front of the queue now, and get a better view of the officer. He’s younger than I initially thought. Severe brush cut. Impassive expression. Aviator mirrored sunglasses. One of those black-eyed aliens from The X-Files springs to mind. The only movement in his face is the slight chewing motion of his jaw; gum, presumably. Other than that he’s as still as death.

And then it’s me. I hand over my passport. He swipes it. Thumbs through it. I see him pause on the visa for Kazakhstan and the Egyptian entry stamp. Then the photo. He scrutinises it, looks up at me. Reflected in the sunglasses, a middle-aged man with salt and pepper hair and a face that looks like it’s been dipped in flour stares back at me with insane eyes.

“What exactly is the purpose of your visit, Sir?”

I’m stammering. I could be fifteen again, struggling to explain exactly why it is that I want to take his fourteen year old daughter to the school dance. I’m dimly aware of someone babbling something about work, business trip, aviation industry, reservation systems.

He watches impassively as I ramble on, then removes his sunglasses and glares at me. “Let me just ask you this: what do you think of Mr Trump?” His eyes narrow to dark slots.

“Donald Trump? That orange dude from The Apprentice? Well, I’ve gotta be honest – the UK version of the show is far superior.”

He freezes. There’s silence. The air seems to have been sucked out of the room. Blood gushes and pounds in my ears. Very slowly, he raises himself up to his full height. I hear a ptui sound of tongue between teeth, followed by a plop, and a quarter-sized blob of brown chewing tobacco appears on the cap of my shoe.

“Boy,” he says, towering over me, “We don’t like your sort here.” He signals towards a couple of security guards in the corner, who start to stride over. “And what we’re gonna do is haul your sorry ass downtown and throw you in an empty cell. Empty, that is, ‘cept for a single bunk and a big, lonely guy called Bubba. And when you’re squealing, squealing like a pig on on its honeymoon, we’re gonna ask you again what you think of our President.

The security guys are upon me now, each grabbing an arm and forcing me to my knees.

“Hey, c’mon guys,” I plead, but they drag me along the floor, nearly yanking my arms out of the sockets. I’m panicking, my eyes imploring the people in the queue for help. They avert their gaze or look at their feet. I start to shout. “Please, someone help me,” I scream. “Please!” Tears are flowing down my cheeks. “Help! Please! Someone rush to Starbucks and bring me one of those Coastal Elite Lattes to catch my liberal snowflake tears. “HEEELLLLLLLPPPP………..!”

Okay, wait. Hold it right there. Now’s not the time to be flippant. Let’s think this through. I can do better than this. Okay. Try again:


He removes his sunglasses and glares at me. “Let me just ask you this: what do you think of Mr Trump?” His eyes narrow to dark slots.

“Oh I’m sorry. I don’t follow pointless celebrities on Twitter. That’s because I’m not a twelve year old girl.

ptui

plop


“Let me just ask you this: what do you think of Mr Trump?”

I unbutton my jacket to reveal my Make America Great Britain Again T-shirt

ptui

plop


And then it’s me. I hand over my passport. He swipes it. Thumbs through it. I realise that’s he’s not actually wearing sunglasses, neither is he chewing tobacco. He scrutinises the photo, glances up at me, hands it back. I turn to go.

“Just hold it right there.” I freeze. The words sound menacing. Slowly, very slowly, I turn to face him. “Welcome to America,” he says, a friendly smile stretching across his face.

“Erm, thanks.”

‘Well, that was easy,’ I think as I follow the signs for baggage reclaim. ‘I don’t know why people make such a fuss about these things. Damn snowflakes.’


Leaving Heathrow
Camera: Nikon FE
Film: Kodak Tmax 400
Process: Developed in D76 1+1