That Was The Month That Was: August 2018

Yep, it’s August’s random selection of snapshots

Spending the afternoon at the Beach in West Wittering, it seemed fitting to take that archetypal holiday camera, the Olympus Trip 35. Millions were sold during its lengthy production run from 1967-1984, during which time there were hardly any changes made to the original genius design. No batteries required; a solar-powered selenium light meter measures the light, and even though selenium photocells don’t go on forever, mine still meters perfectly. If you’re of a certain age, you’ll remember those classic commercials in the 70s with fashion photographer David Bailey.

Camera: Olympus Trip 35
Film: Fomapan 100



Coco The Cocker loves the sea



She may be 15, but Daisy still gets excited about going for a walk. The square format and the belly level perspective probably give away that this was taken with a twin lens reflex camera, in this case a Yashica Mat.
If you’re shooting a meter-less camera and using sunny 16 to calculate exposure, then these sunny cloudless days are the easiest. You can set and forget. I’ve it said that in the UK full sun is never that bright and we should actually use sunny 11, but 16 always works out perfectly for me. Perhaps it’s different if you’re further north.

Camera: Yashica Mat 124G
Film: Ilford FP4



When I step outside my home first thing on a sunny morning, this is one of the first things I see

Camera: Pentax KM
Film: Kodak Tmax 100

And this is the view coming back after my morning coffee



Amongst the dunes on West Wittering Beach.

Whenever I see dunes, I think of the BBC’s 1968 adaption of MR James’ Whistle And I’ll Come To you. If you’re a fan of MR James, then I heartily recommend the Mark Gatiss documentary MR James: Ghost Writer.



This is not a great photo of The Copper House, mainly because it gives no sense of scale or location. Next time I’ll do better. It’s a statue of George III mounted on a plinth in 1831, atop of Snow Hill in Windsor Great Park. When I’m cycling round the park, this is my favourite pace to stop and have my sandwiches. On a clear day you can see the control tower at Heathrow and the arches of Wembley Arena.



My current home of Chertsey is one of the oldest market towns in England. Of particular historical note is Chertsey Abbey. Founded in the ungodly year of 666, it was sacked by the Vikings in 875, who burnt it down and killed all the monks. Bastards. It was later rebuilt in stone, although all that remains is a pile of several dozen bricks, and I’m not totally convinced of their provenance. Its former presence is evidenced more strongly in many local names however, for example Abbey River, Abbey Fields, and Monk’s Walk.

Monk’s walk is an enclosed footpath that apparently once started from the Abbey, but now begins several hundred yards further along in Ferry Lane. It runs for about a mile and a half and you emerge quite suddenly next to St Mary’s Church in Thorpe. The exact date when the Church was built is unknown, although in 1963 a Roman cinerary urn was dug up in the churchyard and subsequently dated to around 150 A.D., indicating that the site itself has been of religious significance for going on 1900 years. It seems likely that the church itself was built in the 12th century, and perhaps Monk’s Walk was indeed a secret route between the Church and the Abbey.

When I cycle along there now the first thing you notice, at least in the summer, are the screams. It runs along the back of what is now Thorpe Park, and through the wire fence you get occasional views of some of the rides. Despite the presence of CCTV and razor wire-topped fences, I think there’s still a few opportunities to sneak into the park, if you’re so inclined.



For fast 35mm film I tend to flit between Tri-X and Tmax 400. Tri-X is a classic, but Tmax has very fine grain for a 400 speed film. I’ve seen ISO 100 films that are far grainier than this.

Camera: Nikon F90X
Film: Kodak Tmax 400



We went to pick our own at Durleigh Marsh Farm. I specifically voted to remain in the EU so we could continue to exploit East Europeans and I wouldn’t end up having to pick my own damn vegetables </sarcasm>


Film Ferrania P30 Alpha

After having the film for more than a year, I’ve eventually got round to shooting some of the alpha version of Film Ferrania’s P30 80 iso reincarnated motion picture film. Developing info is a bit thin on the ground but I finally decided to go with D76 (stock) at 9 mins, 3 gentle agitations per minute. That seems to have worked out well. I don’t shoot a great deal of medium speed 35mm film, but I’m really pleased with this. Contrast is…..erm…..contrasty, grain is virtually non-existent. Ferrania says the next batches will be up in the shop in the Autumn, after which it should become permanently available. I hope the day will come when it’s available in medium format.


Camera: Nikon FE / Nikon F90X
Film: Film Ferrania P30 Alpha
Process: Kodak D76 Stock 9 Mins
Brompton and Brookwood Cemeteries


London Welcomes Trump

Friday 13 July, London Together Against Trump protest

Camera: Nikon F90X
Film: Kodak Tri-X
Process: Kodak D76 1+1

The results of a recent ICM poll on British attitudes towards Donald Trump:

Trump makes the world a more dangerous place

Agree: 63%

Disagree: 16%

He only won because of Russian support

Agree: 33%

Disagree: 28%

He is doing a good job as President

Agree: 22%

Disagree: 53%

I’d like to see a politician like Trump as British PM

Agree: 20%

Disagree: 63%

Trump as President is good for the UK

Agree: 18%

Disagree: 53%

He is generally honest and tells the truth

Agree: 17%

Disagree: 60%

Politicians like Trump speak for people like me

Agree: 16%

Disagree: 62%


Recently….

Bits & pieces from the last month or so….

I’ve been telling myself for quite a while that I don’t need any more cameras. And surprisingly, for most of that time I’ve been listening to myself. But I have been thinking about the Voigtländer Vito series of cameras for some time, and when I came across this one in pristine condition for £25 I was tempted. Throw in a Voigtländer shoe-mounted rangefinder and an after-market instruction guide, plus the fact the seller claim to have film-tested it, and I was sold.

The Vito BL is a 35mm viewfinder camera with a 50mm f/3.5 lens. The serial number engraved on the lens barrel dates in to about 1958 (source). This is a solid piece of German engineering, and would have cost just over £30 when new bought new. That’s around about two weeks average wages back then, so a fair chunk of money. I was particuarly surpised but delighted to find that the uncoupled selenium meter is still working, although I haven’t tested it for accuracy yet. I probably won’t use it as top plate mounted meters can be a bit of a fiddle. But let’s see how it goes.

Camera: Nikon F90X
Film: Kodak Tmax 400
Process: Developed in D76 1+1



The Empire Music Hall Theatre, Kingston Upon Thames. Opened in 1910, it’s now a Wetherspoons pub. I guess that’s what they call progress…. 🙁

Kingston
Camera: Fujifilm X100T


Obama Burgers!!

Olympus 35 RC, 1970s pint-sized pocket rangefinder. I got mine from Trip Man, £100 including new seals and skin, and guranteed for 6 months. You can get them cheaper if you’re prepared to play Ebay roulette.

The RC takes the now defunct PX625 1.35V mercury batteries. There are several possibilities here. One is to use the Weincell Zinc Air replacement, which has the advantage of matching the original 1.35 voltage. The downside is they are a bit expensive and have a fairly short life. There are other PX625 replacements available, but they tend to have a voltage of around 1.55V and so require you to compensate by adjusting the ISO. In the end I decided to splash out and spend £30 on the MR-9 adaptor from The Small Battery Company. This allows you to use the cheap and readily available silver oxide cell (SR-43 or silver 386) and adjusts the output to the correct 1.35v. It’s important to remember to always use a silver oxide battery as alkaline batteries tend to give inconsistent results.

Geraldine and me at the Pitcher & Piano, Richmond

Piccadilly, London
Camera: Fujifilm X100T

A quick Autumn day trip to Oxford with Lynn
Camera: Fujifilm X100T

DSCF9403

This film’s been kicking around in the FE for a few months. I really need to use this camera more; it’s fantastic.

Camera: Nikon FE
Film: Kodak Tmax 400
Process: Developed in D76 1+1

Always good when I manage to sneak myself in the picture

Head in the clouds

You can never have too much camera porn

A new Anouar Braham album is always something to look forward to….

And finally…always end on a positive


The People’s March for Europe

These photos were taken on a pro-European march a few weeks back. I should probably write a bit more about it, but since legislation was introduced in the late 1990s to make civil discussion about politics on the internet illegal, I’ve found it’s best just to keep quiet.

London, Sep 09 2017
Camera: Nikon F90x
Film: Kodak Tmax 400
Process:Developed in D76 1+1

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