That Was The Month That Was: May & June 2019

The usual semi-regular round up of random snaps, this time from May & June 2019

Ella having a Wild Hair Day
Nikon F100 / Kodak Tmax 400 / Kodak D76 1+1

girl trampoline

Coco The Cocker looking effortlessly gorgeous

Coco the Cocker Spaniel

I never thought we’d be voting in the 2019 European Parliament elections…

European Election Poll Card

Chocolate fondue night at Helen’s
Fujifilm X100T

Coco, the canine water diviner. If there’s water out there, she’ll find it. The dirtier the better.

Nikon F100 / Kodak Tmax 400 / Developed in D76 1+1

working cocker spaniel

Giving the whatchoo talkin bout willis look….

working cocker spaniel

Home and dry

working cocker spaniel

Other people sometimes have dogs too. Some of them are nearly as beautiful as Coco. Nearly.

Thought I’d order a few rolls of Kosmo Foto Mono now it’s available in medium format

Dorothy and Domino

I think the sky in the following two pictures shows how incredibly fine-grained Tmax 400 can be for a film of its speed, as long as you expose it carefully.

Some people have a garden or yard at the back of their house. Jane has the South Downs National Park.

The Witch’s Tree

Sunday morning, making bread and flapjacks

“Yeah, whatever. I’ll get excited when there’s something I can actually eat”

Enough excitement for one morning

Church of the Nazerene, just next to Clapham Junction

Nikon F100 / Kodak Tmax 100 / Kodak D76 1+1

I took this whilst walking over Battersea Bridge. That’s the remnants of Lots Road Power Station on the right. Turn around 180 degreees, and upstream you can just about make out the iconic chimneys of its much more famous counterpart.

And looking down, someone has decided to go wading in the Thames…

Lots Road Power Station is a disused coal and later oil-fired and later gas-fired power station in Chelsea. Built in 1905 and decommissioned in 2002. Since then seems to have been in a constant state of redevelopment.

Upside down in coach No. 7

That Was The Month That Was: April 2019

April’s round up of bits and pieces, mainly consisting of the animals and Ella. Oh, and a castle.

This month I used only my Nikon F100. Coupled with the fantastic Nikon Nikon 35mm AF-D (and occasionally the 50mm f/1.8 AF-D), I’d be happy if that was the only 35mm camera I could have. The snappy auto-focus is great for these middle-ages eyes. And besides, when I want to slow things down I just grab one of my medium format cameras.

Nikon F100 / Kosmo Foto Mono / Developed in D76 1+1

Brookwood Cemetery

Cowdray Castle in Midhurst is one of England’s most important early Tudor houses and is known to have been visited by both King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I. It was built in 1542, but in 1793, whilst undergoing repairs and refurbishments for the impending marriage of the 8th Viscount Montague, a devastating fire took hold and most of the property was destroyed. The Kitchen Tower is the only part of the mansion to remain intact. More significantly, I have to walk past it on the way back from the pub.

cowdray castle

It’s a rare month that I don’t have at least a quick wander round Brookwood Cemetery

Brookwood Cemetery

Brookwood Cemetery

Brookwood Cemetery

Brookwood Cemetery

Saint Edward Brotherhood is a small Orthodox Christian monastery in Brookwood. Enshrined in the church are the relics of St Edward The Martyr, the King of England who died in 978 and who was succeeded by force by Ethelred the Unready.

Church of St. Edward the Martyr Brookwood

Nikon F100 / Kodak Tmax 100 / Developed in D76 1+1

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

I snap this guy quite a lot, mainly because he’s right outside my house. Local resident Charles James Fox was a prominent British Whig statesman whose parliamentary career spanned 38 years in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. He served briefly as Foreign Secretary, and much like a more recent incumbent of that post, he was famed for his licentiousness. However, unlike Boris Johnson, he didn’t play a major part in turning the UK in to a laughing stock.

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

midhurst ponds

Daisy sporting her best Austin Powers ruffle

springer spaniel

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

Nikon F100

Kodak trumpet Tmax 400 as the world’s sharpest 400 speed film. I can’t disagree. It’s incredibly fine-grained for a film of that speed, and if I could only ever shoot one film then this would be a perfect all rounder. The F100 has a max shutter speed of 1/8000, so you can still shoot fast film fully open in the brightest light.

Nikon F100 / Kodak Tmax 400 / Developed in D76 1+1

Nikon F100

Down to West Wittering beach with the dogs

Nikon F100

“I bloody love sausage rolls, me”

“Mention I have sand on my face and you die….”

Nikon F100

“That’s enough excitement for one day….”

Nikon F100

Glastonbury Tor

The last time in I was in Glastonbury was way back in 1986 for the renowned music festival. Except that’s not strictly true, because the festival actually takes place seven miles down the road in the village of Pilton. Nevertheless, the town of Glastonbury appears to be populated by people who got lost on their way back from the festival sometime in the mid 1970s. They clearly drifted along in a haze of weed and never got up the energy to leave. The town itself is peppered with hippy-dippy shops selling everything from wholemeal sandals to organic tie-dye chakras. But our main motivation for visiting was to climb to the top of Glastonbury Tor and see the remnants of the ancient church. The original wooden church was apparently destroyed by an earthquake in 1275. The stone church of St Michael’s church was built on the same site in the 14th century, but all that currently remains is the roofless tower. But it’s certainly worth the trek.

Nikon F90X / Kodak Tmax 100

Look Gerald, We’re Higher Than The Birds

The first time I had a pizza primavera it struck me that only the Italians would name a season after a pizza. Well, it turns out us Brits are just as bad. The village of Cheddar lies beneath the famous cliffs of Cheddar Gorge, where presumably they mine the renowned cheese that the Somerset village is named after. The gorge cuts through the limestone Mendip Hills in the south west of England, and over our five day stay we did exactly the two things you’re supposed to do: hiking the hills and drinking cider.

All photos Nikon F90X / Kodak Tmax 100

The Cider Barn really doesn’t need a marketing department. It’s a barn; they serve cider. What more do you need to know? I’d be exaggerating if I said the first night we popped in the piano player stopped mid-stride and and all the guys reached for their Colt 45s. But only slightly. The barkeep, Bear-Strangler Rockhard (or Nigel to his face), told us rather than asked us what to drink. But by day two we were considered regulars, and offered some of the special under-the-counter scrumpy that’s fermented with a dead sheep in the barrel and gives you only a 50% chance of any sight loss becoming permanent.

This was odd. We came across this dumped old bus in a ditch and covered in bushes. It wasn’t near any roads so I’ve no idea how it got there. I don’t know much about vintage vehicles, but this looks to me to date from the ’50s or ’60s. I’d recently watched A Simple Plan, so it did occur to me there might be a dead driver and four million dollars inside. Fortunately not, and I haven’t since been caught in a wicked web of lies, deceit and murder. Not really what you want when you’re trying to have a relaxing holiday.

I think you’re doing pretty well if you can wear a working cocker spaniel out. Although to be fair, for every mile we walked Coco ran at least three.