Kensal Green Cemetery


Camera: Pentax KM
Film: Kodak Tmax 100
Process: Kodak D76 1+1

Yes it’s another cemetery, and not only that, another one of London’s Magnificent Seven.

I’ve visited and written about Kensal Green Cemetery previously, about how its atmospheric, gothic nature made it an ideal filming location for a key scene in Vincent Price’s 1973 schlock-horror movie Theatre Of Blood. It’s the stirring of those childhood memories of Friday and Saturday nights, wrapped up in bed in the dark and watching camp horror films on a black and white portable, that makes Kensal Green my favourite of London’s grand old cemeteries.

Kensal Green is the oldest of London’s Magnificent Seven cemeteries, established in 1832. Up until then, most of London’s dead had been buried in small parish churchyards, but overcrowding lead to contamination of the water supply and subsequent health epidemics. Of course, when I say ‘contamination’ I’m euphemistically referring to bits of dead bodies. Hmmmnn…there’s something in the water….

As mentioned in the last post, I don’t shoot a lot of medium speed 35mm film. And whereas I’d normally shoot something like this on medium format, my experience with Ferrania P30 prompted me to rummage round in the fridge and see what was there; a couple of rolls of Kodak Tmax 100, as it turned out.

To my shame I realised it’s been quite a while since I used my Pentax KM. I’d almost forgotten what a joy this all-mechanical, all-manual 1970s SLR is. When I do eventually get round to rationalising the number of cameras I have, this will definitely be one of the five or six I keep for regular use.

I’m not normally keen on using more than one lens; I like to keep things simple and a choice of lens is just another distracting decision that needs to be made. But as well as the wonderful 50mm SMC Pentax-M F/1.7, I took along the 28mm Pentax-M F/3.5 I picked for a few quid a couple of years back to see how that’d perform. Not great, as it happens. Even stopped down it doesn’t seem particularly sharp, and it also overexposed by up to a stop. It’ll have to go.


Film Ferrania P30 Alpha

After having the film for more than a year, I’ve eventually got round to shooting some of the alpha version of Film Ferrania’s P30 80 iso reincarnated motion picture film. Developing info is a bit thin on the ground but I finally decided to go with D76 (stock) at 9 mins, 3 gentle agitations per minute. That seems to have worked out well. I don’t shoot a great deal of medium speed 35mm film, but I’m really pleased with this. Contrast is…..erm…..contrasty, grain is virtually non-existent. Ferrania says the next batches will be up in the shop in the Autumn, after which it should become permanently available. I hope the day will come when it’s available in medium format.


Camera: Nikon FE / Nikon F90X
Film: Film Ferrania P30 Alpha
Process: Kodak D76 Stock 9 Mins
Brompton and Brookwood Cemeteries


London Welcomes Trump

Friday 13 July, London Together Against Trump protest

Camera: Nikon F90X
Film: Kodak Tri-X
Process: Kodak D76 1+1

The results of a recent ICM poll on British attitudes towards Donald Trump:

Trump makes the world a more dangerous place

Agree: 63%

Disagree: 16%

He only won because of Russian support

Agree: 33%

Disagree: 28%

He is doing a good job as President

Agree: 22%

Disagree: 53%

I’d like to see a politician like Trump as British PM

Agree: 20%

Disagree: 63%

Trump as President is good for the UK

Agree: 18%

Disagree: 53%

He is generally honest and tells the truth

Agree: 17%

Disagree: 60%

Politicians like Trump speak for people like me

Agree: 16%

Disagree: 62%